Communication with the messages board

We have this week introduced the students to our Investigations messages board. This is a board for student/teacher communications. This is a great way to encourage the students to think for themselves, develop communication skills, articulate their needs and to build personal organization into their day. Messages can be written or recorded using talking tin lids.

At the end of Tuesday’s session we were left lots of very polite messages about the children’s learning needs.

Here is a short video with some further explanations.

Messages Board explained from Mr Ramage on Vimeo.

Thanks Prep Team

Focus on developing story writing and what is a Puggle?

Our preps are showing an increased understanding that a good story needs to entertain the reader and they are beginning to experiment with using descriptive words and starting their sentences with different words to make the story sound like a ‘real book’. We have even had a story written where the student decided to photograph and introduce all the characters first so that the reader would know ‘who was who’ when they were reading the story. Enjoy the books below, read by their authors. Many more are being written at the moment so look out for more posts…

and did you know what a puggle was….we didn’t before Austen’s Investigation!!

Doll house party by Maya from Mr Ramage on Vimeo.

Granny Saves the Snake by Holly from Mr Ramage on Vimeo.

Puggles by Austen from Mr Ramage on Vimeo.

Talking Tin lids to support Instructional Writing.

Our prep children love the Talking Tin lids in our classroom. They are simple to use, portable and allow children to record, reflect and correct the message they are giving with their oral language and here if what they say makes sense.

There are so many ways to use the tin lids in any literacy activity. One of the ways in which the prep children have used them is to help structure  Instructional or Procedural writing. We often find that when children have conducted a lengthy Investigation they want to share the steps to take for their project if another child want to follow their learning. This gives an authentic reason for teaching the genre of instructional language and writing.

Or if they have invented a game then writing instuctions about how to play the game also gives  a real life context for the writing genre.

The  video and photo below demonstrates the use of the tin lids to help create an interactive classroom display to assist another student wanting to play a matching game that Maxton had made.

The example below speaks for itself and is an extension of work that we have previously posted about on our blog.

This is the finished writing produced through interactive partner writing assisted by one of our parent helpers.

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Talking tin lids to enhance oral language

The prep children are starting to explore the key elements that make a narrative story, such as the beginning, middle, end of a story and settings, characters and plots. We have used the talking tin lids to provide the students with an opportunity to use their oral language to record the beginning, middle and end of a familiar fairytale story. Working in small groups this gave the children an opportunity to use their oral language and to practice summarizing parts of the story in their own words. They then had to move to another story and listen to another group’s recording before deciding how to order the talking tin lids as beginning, middle and end of the story.

Using talking tin lids to enhance oral language from Mr Ramage on Vimeo.

This is a great way to allow children to use oral language while also building up their understanding of how to retell and summarize a story.

Talking Tin Lids

We have been using Talking Tin lids for a couple of years now in our classroom program. They are a wonderful tool that enable young learners to easily record up to 40 seconds of information that can then be played back, erased, recorded. The talking tin lids are magnetic so they can be used on whiteboards and can compliment displays around the room and be used in an interactive way by the children. We have used them regularly to compliment our Literacy program and our Developmental Curriculum. For example, a child might make a model and record what the model is and its special features, the recording can then be displayed with the model in class. Alternatively, a talking tin lid might be used by a student to record their writing as they read it back. If their writing is for an audience, such as a story, the talking tin lid can be displayed next to the writing, bringing the written work to life with the oral reading. This is great when a child who cannot yet confidently read wants to listen to and enjoy the story.

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We have just purchased 20 extra talking tin lids purchased from a company in the UK with lots of other interesting voice recording technology products …check out www.talkingproducts.co.uk.

Children independently select a talking tin lid, sign it out and return it when they are finished. We also have created a ready made and purposeful number game board as the talking tin lids are numbered 1-25.

Children independently select a talking tin lid, sign it out and return it when they are finished. We also have created a ready made and purposeful number game board as the talking tin lids are numbered 1-25.

We are now able to use the talking tin lids to compliment out Literacy program, both by enhancing oral language development and as an aid for the children to use when writing. For emerging writers they are great to help them remember what they wanted to write and then to listen and check back to see if their writing matches their spoken words. These short videos demonstrate how the children have been using the technology to support their recount writing this week.

Students using talking tin lids to support writing. from Mr Ramage on Vimeo.

Using talking tin lids to support writing from Mr Ramage on Vimeo.